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Replacing Chainsaw Chain

Identifying and Replacing Chain

In many cases, Oregon offers multiple saw chain options for chainsaws. Here is information to help you determine the right saw chain fit-up for your chainsaw and the different chain types to meet the needs of different chainsaw users. Learn how to identify and replace chain by finding the chain pitch, chain gauge, and how to measure chainsaw chain.

    How to Measure Chainsaw Bar

    How to Measure Chainsaw Bar

    Your guide bar's length is represented by the cutting length (or "called length"), which is different from its total or overall length. The cutting length is the distance from the front of the saw to the tip of the guide bar, rounded to the nearest inch.

    Tip: If you have an Oregon bar, look at the part number stamped on the motor end. The first two digits, such as 16, tell you the called length.

     

    How to Measure Chainsaw Bar
    How Do I Measure the Length of My Saw Chain?

    How Do I Measure the Length of My Saw Chain?

    The length of your chain is determined by counting the number of drive links in your chain. A drive link is the saw chain component that guides the chain through the guide bar rails and around the sprocket. It is very important that the number of drive links are a match for the guide bar you are using since your chainsaw won’t function properly otherwise. 

    The drive link count is included in the saw chain part number, after the chain type designation (example, 20BPX066, H66). Common examples of drive length count are 70 for "D" or "72" chain and 56 for "S" or "91" chain.

    Note: Your drive link count correlates to your guide bar’s overall size, which can vary by manufacturer. Oregon bars may take a different drive link count than that of another brand.



     

    How Do I Measure the Length of My Saw Chain?
    What is the Saw Chain Product Family?

    What is the Saw Chain Product Family?

    Oregon understands that the need of woodcutters – professionals and novices – are as diverse as the terrains and environments in which they work.

    We have organized our saw chains and guide bars into product families with key characteristics that different users will value. These product families will ensure that you choose the right chain and bar based on your everyday needs. It will make understanding the differences between our products effortless. 
     

    Learn more
    What is the Saw Chain Product Family?

    How to Replace a Chainsaw Chain and Bar

    Learn how to replace your chainsaw chain and bar and get insider tips on wear patterns that help indicate when the chain and bar has reached its end-of-life condition.

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      Proper chainsaw chain tension is critical for the performance of your chainsaw. Learn how to check and tighten your saw chain to avoid the risk of kickback and chainsaw related injuries.
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      Setting-Up Your Chainsaw

      To get your chainsaw ready for optimal performance, follow these key lubrication and oil usage tips.

      Find a Local Dealer

      Go to our dealer locator to find a servicing dealer near you.
      Part Finder

      Part Finder

      Find a full selection of saw chain specifically made to fit your chainsaw.
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